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Early Christian-Muslim Debate on the Unity of God: Three by Sara Leila Husseini

By Sara Leila Husseini

Early Christian-Muslim Debate at the solidarity of God examines the writings of 3 of the earliest identified Christian theologians to write down entire theological works in Arabic. Theodore Abū Qurra, Abū Rā’iṭa and ‘Ammār al-Baṣrī supply helpful perception into early Christian-Muslim debate presently after the increase of the Islamic empire.
Through shut exam in their writings at the doctrine of the Trinity, Sara Husseini demonstrates the creativity of those theologians, who utilize language, sort and argumentation attribute of Islamic theological proposal (kalām), on the way to support articulate their original non secular truths. Husseini bargains shut research of the authors separately and relatively, exploring their engagement with Islamic theology and their function during this interesting period.

Sara Leila Husseini, Ph.D. (2011), college of Birmingham, united kingdom, is presently a Communications consultant in Palestine. She has formerly labored on interfaith initiatives in Palestine, Lebanon and Jordan.
Readership
Students of Christian-Muslim family; all attracted to questions surrounding the character and solidarity of God; people with an curiosity within the heart East and/or Islamic theological concept (kalām).

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Additional resources for Early Christian-Muslim Debate on the Unity of God: Three Christian Scholars and Their Engagement With Islamic Thought (9th Century C.E.)

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M. 72 A number of sects and schools of thought began to emerge as a result of varying positions on such questions, the most famous of whom would come to be known as the Muʿtazila, and who, for a good part of the ninth century, would not only enjoy theological dominance but also political prominence, particularly during the reign of al-Ma‍ʾmūn (r. 813–833). Characterised by the seemingly contradictory attitudes of the promotion of intellectual freedom and a love of foreign learning in contrast to an almost tyrannical demand of allegiance to a particular doctrine, al-Ma‍ʾmūn forms a fascinating figure.

70 Griffith, The church in the shadow of the mosque, p. 41. 71 Majid Fakhry refers to theology as ‘the handmaid of politics’, whilst Franz Rosenthal notes that political questions prompted ‘deep theological discussions’. M. 72 A number of sects and schools of thought began to emerge as a result of varying positions on such questions, the most famous of whom would come to be known as the Muʿtazila, and who, for a good part of the ninth century, would not only enjoy theological dominance but also political prominence, particularly during the reign of al-Ma‍ʾmūn (r.

P. 24. , p. 94 n. 74. M. Allard, ‘Les chrétiens à Baghdad’, Arabica 9 (1962), 375–388. Mark Swanson gives examples such as Palestine, where Aramaic gave way to Arabic as early as the eighth century, and later Egypt, where Arabic replaced the native Coptic language to such an extent that by 1200 Coptic is described as being ‘practically dead’. Swanson, ‘Arabic as a Christian language’, p. 5. Gerhard Endress points to the same two 20 chapter 1 as well as its cultural, ethnic and church community ties.

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