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Holy Fools in Byzantium and Beyond (Oxford Studies in by Sergey A. Ivanov, Simon Franklin

By Sergey A. Ivanov, Simon Franklin

There are saints in Orthodox Christian tradition who overturn the normal proposal of sainthood. Their behavior should be unruly and salacious, they could blaspheme or even kill--yet, mysteriously, these round them deal with them with much more reverence. Such saints are referred to as "holy fools." during this pioneering examine Sergey A. Ivanov examines the phenomenon of holy foolery from a cultural point of view. He identifies its necessities and its improvement in non secular concept, and strains the emergence of the 1st hagiographic texts describing those paradoxical saints. He describes the beginnings of holy foolery in Egyptian monasteries of the 5th century, by means of its excessive aspect within the towns of Byzantium, with an eventual decline within the 12th to fourteenth centuries. He additionally compares the $64000 Russian culture of holy fools, which in a few shape has survived to today.

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Holy Fools in Byzantium and Beyond (Oxford Studies in Byzantium)

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Extra resources for Holy Fools in Byzantium and Beyond (Oxford Studies in Byzantium)

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43 See E. A. Judge, ‘The Earliest Use of Monachos for Monk and the Origin of Monasticism’, Jahrbuch fu¨r Antike und Christentum 20 (1977), 73–86. 46 Although such maxims were widespread throughout the Eastern Christian world, even in remote regions such as Ethiopia,47 Egypt remained the acknowledged model for the type of self-abasement from which holy foolery was later to evolve. 48 The concealment of virtues is, of course, a traditional Christian attribute, but any simulation carries in itself the potential for holy foolery.

861. 44 Precursors and Emergence invariably replies in the aYrmative, and each time God’s nomination sounds unexpected and astonishing. The Historia monachorum in Aegypto contains a long story about a famous hermit, Paphnutios, who asks God this question three times. God Wrst names a Xute-player. The righteous elder visits him and asks about his feats, but the Xute-player insists that he is ‘a sinner, a drunk, and a lecher’. He admits, however, that once he saved a virgin from rape and that once he helped a worthy lady who fell into poverty.

Precursors and Emergence 35 Another example of the use of the word salos, this time in Palestine: Near the village where the blessed Silvanus lived, was the abode of one of the brethren, who simulated foolishness (ðæïóðïØïýìåíïò ìøæßÆí): whenever he encountered another brother, he would immediately laugh and do the other suchlike things (ŒÆd ºïØða KŒ ôïýôïı), and then they would go away and leave him. ’ [But the holy elders declared that they had not seen everybody, and despite Silvanus’ assurances they departed dissatisWed.

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