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Introduction to Radiological Physics Radiation Dosimetry by Frank Herbert Attix

By Frank Herbert Attix

A simple presentation of the extensive strategies underlying radiological physics and radiation dosimetry for the graduate-level scholar. Covers photon and neutron attenuation, radiation and charged particle equilibrium, interactions of photons and charged debris with subject, radiotherapy dosimetry, in addition to photographic, calorimetric, chemical, and thermoluminescence dosimetry. contains many new derivations, akin to Kramers X-ray spectrum, in addition to issues that experience no longer been completely analyzed in different texts, resembling broad-beam attenuation and geometrics, and the reciprocity theorem. matters are layed out in a logical series, making the themes more straightforward for college kids to stick with. Supplemented with various diagrams and tables.

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The average length of the paths in the sphere is obviously the same above and below. The number of rays striking the flat detector is the same above and below the foil, but the length of each track within the detector is I l/cos 17 111. DESCRIPTION OF IONIZING RADIATION FIELDS 81 times as long below as it is above the foil. Thus the total track length in the flat detector is also I l/cos 81 times as great below the foil as above. Evidently, then, both of the detectors read more by the factor I l/cos 81 below the foil for the case of penetrating radiation.

16) gives an equation for the planar flux density pp with respect to the x-y plane in Fig. 28) E=O and the planar fluence aPis simply the time integral of vp over any desired time interval, as in Eq. 7). = @ for a given time In an isotropic field of radiation we have qfl = icp; hence interval. The factor 1 is obtained as the ratio of Eq. 28) to Eq. 16), which can be simplified in steps, as in Eqs. 30) IONIZING RADIATION 18 PROBLEMS What is the photon energy range corresponding to the UV radiation band?

DESCRIPTION OF IONIZING RADIATION FIELDS 81 times as long below as it is above the foil. Thus the total track length in the flat detector is also I l/cos 81 times as great below the foil as above. Evidently, then, both of the detectors read more by the factor I l/cos 81 below the foil for the case of penetrating radiation. Now consider the easily stopped radiation in case (b). The sphere again reads more below the foil than above by the factor (l/cos 81, since that is the factor by which the number of striking rays increases, and each ray deposits all its energy.

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